whiskey bottles and brand new cars

whiskey bottles and brand new cars

Whiskey Bottles And Brand New Cars

On Labor Day weekend in 1976, Rossington and fellow Skynyrd guitarist Allen Collins were both involved in separate auto accidents in their hometown of Jacksonville. Rossington had just bought a new Ford Torino, and hit an oak tree while under the influence of alcohol and other drugs. The band was due to go on tour in a couple of days, but had to postpone this tour due to Rossington’s accident. The band members were not at all pleased with Rossington, and fined him $5000 for the delay caused to the band’s schedule. Van Zant and Collins wrote the song “That Smell” based on the wreck, and Rossington’s state of influence from drugs and alcohol at the time. The specific lyrics that refer to the wreck: “Whiskey bottles and brand new cars, oak tree you’re in my way. There’s too much coke and too much smoke.”
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Whiskey Bottles And Brand New Cars

That Smell by Lynyrd Skynyrd SongfactsArtistfactsLyricsSongfactsThis song is about Skynyrd guitarist Gary Rossington, who bought a new car (a Ford Torino), got drunk, and crashed it into a tree, then a house (“whiskey bottles, brand new car, oak tree you’re in my way”). The band was supposed to start a tour in a few days, but had to postpone it because of Rossington’s injuries.Lead singer Ronnie Van Zant and guitarist Allen Collins wrote this song. They were not pleased with Rossington, whose drug and alcohol problems were affecting the band.The band fined Rossington $5000 for holding up the tour. Skynyrd made an effort to stay sober on this tour. Drugs and alcohol were banned from the dressing rooms.Ronnie Van Zant, guitarist Steve Gaines, and backup singer Cassie Gaines were killed in a plane crash a few days after Lynyrd Skynyrd’s 1977 tour started. Some of the lyrics in this song refer to death, and the cover of the album, which had just been released, showed the band enveloped in flames.This song features the famous whistle of Ronnie Van Zant. He learned to whistle very loud so he could call the dogs when he went hunting.
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Whiskey Bottles And Brand New Cars

This song is about Skynyrd guitarist Gary Rossington, who bought a new car (a Ford Torino), got drunk, and crashed it into a tree, then a house (“whiskey bottles, brand new car, oak tree you’re in my way”). The band was supposed to start a tour in a few days, but had to postpone it because of Rossington’s injuries.
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Whiskey Bottles And Brand New Cars

Straightforward biography of the Southern rock band.Though staples such as “Sweet Home Alabama” and “Free Bird” have kept Lynyrd Skynyrd’s brand alive through recordings and reunion tours for almost three decades, Ribowsky (The Last Cowboy: A Life of Tom Landry, 2013, etc.) makes a convincing case that the band died with the plane crash that took frontman Ronnie Van Zant and other passengers. However, the author overstates most of what he claims for Van Zant and the hard-drinking, rabble-rousing band, who “unwittingly but inexorably…found a place among the artistic giants of the American South, their thematic content deceptively simple but as soul deep as any Faulkner novel or Tennessee Williams play.” Of Southern rock in general, Ribowsky asserts that the “songwriters had become the modern southern literati, and in their pens lay the definitions of a new reconstruction of the South and southern manhood.” Perhaps such writing is an attempt to compensate for lack of access and primary sources, as most of the quotes are from other books and articles, while those few who agreed to talk to the author—former manager Alan Walden, booking agent Alex Hodges and guitarist Ed King—come across much better than the many who didn’t (Van Zant’s widow, the remaining, surviving band members, original producer Al Kooper). Ultimately, it’s surprising that the band lasted as long as it did, even before the tragic crash, for the musicians seemed bent on destruction, fighting and drinking and drugging beyond any bounds of self-restraint. Praised for the sensitivity of his songwriting, Van Zant would throw punches without provocation (beating at least one woman in these pages) and once tried to toss a roadie from a plane—at 30,000 feet. Serviceable but often floridly overwritten. Though Ribowsky accuses the band’s current incarnation and those who market the legacy of “mercenary profit motive,” the same charge could be leveled at the book.
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Whiskey Bottles And Brand New Cars

“About Skynyrd guitarist Gary Rossington” is it really? the first two lines may be, but the rest of the song is about addiction (drug, alcohol, tobacco). Was not Gary intoxicated? thence the reference to “whisky bottle, brand new car” that seems to more accurately describe the song, but please correct me if i’m wrong.Greg – Asheville, Nc
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Whiskey Bottles And Brand New Cars

Skynyrd walked a risky high wire. They were playing to at least four distinct audiences – their “backwoods, redneck” home turf, the national market that had no particular affection for Southern norms, the cognoscenti of rock critics, and the industry that saw Southern music as merely regional and not “serious” players, even as powerful brokers in New York (Ahmet Ertegun) and L.A. (David Geffen) looted, respectively, Stax/Volt soul and then country rock. The multilevel nature of their music reflected a painful attempt to redraw regional lines and form a “New Confederacy” while still remaining loyal to the conditioned behaviors of the Old Confederacy. Thus, “Sweet Home Alabama,” one of the most distinct Southern songs, is also one of the most prone to exploitation. This was Ronnie’s fault, being too cute by half about Wallace and Watergate, etc., without thinking through the repercussions of praise for a racist governor (twice, he sang Wallace “was true”) and feckless Southern hubris. With Skynyrd, however, it’s not possible to denigrate their music and influence from 1974-77. They  not only actualized the brooding, self-made Southern man ethos of Ronnie’s writing and singing, but also covered Jimmie Rodgers, Merle Haggard, and JJ Cale, and opened a raw,  visceral byway within the soft country rock parameters of their era. And that simply has not been repeated, nor will it ever be.
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Whiskey Bottles And Brand New Cars

There are those who insist King was the real hidden hand behind the band maturing from backwoods to baronial. Others insist he had a hidden agenda to control the workings and direction of the band. King, a New Jersey native who tasted the sweet life in L.A. with a number-one record (the exquisite “Incense and Peppermints”), from the start felt he was the classic outsider among a clique that had grown up together in Southern Man poverty, and solidarity. Just as he believed he never received proper credit for writing “Peppermints,” he believed he was kept from props for the immortal guitar licks of “Sweet Home Alabama.” As a New Yorker most of my life, I feel for King, since I have been vilified by some in the deranged postmodern culture of Skynyrd fans, for somehow “denigrating” the band’s legend (an absurd notion given their deliriously self-destructive behavior), I can imagine King’s life being made miserable by these same brain-dead “fans.” I also was stunned to learn that Ronnie, whose epitaph was that he never feared anyone, actually tried to get King to tell the band’s manager Peter Rudd that the band wanted to cancel what remained of a bummer tour. However, much as I admire King, and made some additions for the paperback on his request, I found racist remarks he made about Trayvon Martin to be execrable, and unforgivable, and made me wonder if the worst traits of Skynyrd, which included conditioned racist parlance, were infectious germs in the air.
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One heady example of the cultural clash and angst-ridden pride within the New South was a rock band from the prosaic streets of Jacksonville, who would flourish as the vanguard of southern pride and rebirth by recasting the ethos of the Southern Man in all his glory and anguish. It was quite a ride they got themselves on. But, inevitably, it was an illusion, a devil’s bargain, for them and the new Confederacy.
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In the absence of revival and with the gradual eroding of the topology and psychology of the South came imagination and longing. Through this looking glass, like the lost souls of Faulkner and Tennessee Williams, southern men were no longer plantation swells but weary, guilt-scarred, middle-class survivors dealing with morals and conundrums. This was the South from which the new generation of artists and musicians would come in the 1960s. Through heredity, they would carry the glory of the Old South within them, as well as the innate fear that stoked almost parodic hubris. As weathered and withered as they were, Southern Men — that is, southern white men — were, as regional historians Anne Goodwyn Jones and Susan V. Donaldson write, “still ‘lords and masters’ at home in the South, regardless of class,” even if only in their minds.
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According to a New York Times article, Lacy Van Zant, patriarch of the Van Zant family, once went to West Jacksonville’s Robert E. Lee High School to plead Rossington’s case to school administrators after the fatherless Rossington was suspended for having long hair. Lacy Van Zant explained to the assistant principal that Rossington’s father, who died shortly after Rossington was born, had died in the Army and that Rossington’s mother needed the money Rossington made playing in his band. Lacy Van Zant further explained that, like his own sons, they were working men and long hair was part of the job.

Published on Aug 3, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
| Jef-m
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