volkswagen sports car

volkswagen sports car

Volkswagen Sports Car

2018 Volkswagen Arteon. Volkswagen On Monday, Volkswagen unveiled the latest addition to its line-up ahead of the 2017 Geneva Motor Show in the form of the Arteon. The stylish four-door combines the space and practicality of a family car with the aggressive looks of a sports car. “The Arteon combines the design elements of a classic sports car with the elegance and space of a fastback,” Volkswagen head designer Klaus Bischoff said in a statement. “It’s an avant-garde business-class Gran Turismo that speaks to the heart and head alike.” The 2018 Arteon will be positioned above the Passat sedan in the brand’s hierarchy — replacing the current-generation CC. In many markets, including the US, the Arteon will be VW’s flagship model when it enters production this summer. The Arteon’s striking looks managed to make it into production with minimal changes from VW’s well-received Sport Coupe Concept GTE, the show car from 2015 on which it’s based. The Arteon will be built on VW Group’s highly praised MQB platform, which underpins a variety of models ranging from the Golf and the Audi TT to the new Atlas SUV. Volkswagen Under the hood, Arteon buyers will get to choose from a selection of six TDI diesel and TSI gasoline engines that range from 148 horsepower to 276 hp in output. US buyers, however, will most likely be limited to a pair of 2.0-liter turbocharged TSI inline-fours producing 188 hp and 276 hp. Both engines are paired with VW’s seven-speed DSG twin-clutch gearbox. Inside, the Arteon is equipped with VW’s Digital Cockpit instrument cluster and a heads-up display. In addition, Arteon buyers will get Volkswagen’s new Discover Pro infotainment system running through a 9.2-inch screen with gesture control. Volkswagen The Arteon also features the latest in driver’s assistance technology in the form of adaptive cruise control, as well as a second-generation Emergency Assist system that will take control of the car if the driver becomes incapacitated. It will not only bring the vehicle to a stop but also steer it to the nearest side lane. The Arteon’s LED headlights feature predictive beam control that uses GPS to more effectively illuminate the road ahead. Volkswagen has not yet announced official pricing for the Arteon, but we expect it to be priced similarly to the CC, which starts at a tick under $35,000.
volkswagen sports car 1

Volkswagen Sports Car

While Volkswagen’s range of cars soon became similar to that of other large European automakers, the Golf has been the mainstay of the Volkswagen lineup since its introduction, and the mechanical basis for several other cars of the company. There have been seven generations of the Volkswagen Golf, the first of which was produced from the summer of 1974 until the autumn of 1983 (sold as the Rabbit in the United States and Canada and as the Caribe in Latin America). Its chassis also spawned the Volkswagen Scirocco sport coupe, Volkswagen Jetta saloon/sedan, Volkswagen Golf Cabriolet convertible, and Volkswagen Caddy pick-up. North American production of the Rabbit commenced at the Volkswagen Westmoreland Assembly Plant near New Stanton, Pennsylvania in 1978. It would be produced in the United States as the Rabbit until the spring of 1984. The second-generation Golf hatchback/Jetta sedan ran from October 1983 until the autumn of 1991, and a North American version produced at Westmoreland Assembly went on sale at the start of the 1985 model year. The production numbers of the first-generation Golf has continued to grow annually in South Africa as the Citi Golf, with only minor modifications to the interior, engine and chassis, using tooling relocated from the New Stanton, Pennsylvania plant when that site began to build the Second Generation car.
volkswagen sports car 2

Volkswagen Sports Car

On 4 March 2005, the European Commission brought an action against the Federal Republic of Germany before the European Court of Justice, claiming that the Volkswagen Law, which prevents any shareholder in Volkswagen from executing more than 20% of the total voting rights in the firm, was illegally restricting the flow of capital in Europe. On 13 February 2007, Advocate General Dámaso Ruiz-Jarabo Colomer submitted an opinion to the court in support of the action. This again opened the possibility of a hostile takeover of VW and so on 26 March of the same year Porsche took its holding of Volkswagen shares to 30.9%. Porsche formally announced in a press statement that it did not intend to take over Volkswagen, but intended the move to avoid a competitor’s taking a large stake and to stop hedge funds from dismantling VW. As expected, on 22 October 2007, the European Court of Justice ruled in agreement with Ruiz-Jarabo and the law was struck down. In October 2007, the European Court of Justice ruled that the VW law was illegal because it was protectionist. At that time, Porsche held 31% of VW shares — although a smaller proportion of voting rights, due to the Volkswagen Law — and there had been speculation that Porsche would be interested in taking over VW if the law did not stand in its way. The court also prevented the government from appointing Volkswagen board members. The German government then rewrote the Volkswagen law, only to be sued again. In October 2013, the EU Court of Justice in Luxembourg ruled that the rewritten Volkswagen law “complied in full” with EU rules.
volkswagen sports car 3

Volkswagen Sports Car

Winner’’s CircleThe top 10 fastest cars from Volkswagen are ranked from fastest to slowest based on their 0-60 times. We crunched the numbers from the best estimates of several premier resources, including Motor Trend, Road & Track, Car & Driver and more.Pulling up at #1 in this class is the 2015 Volkswagen GTI, which races 0-60 mph in 5.6 seconds. Sports cars with this rate of acceleration are generally classified as Fast Cars. It darts ahead of the #2 ranked 2012 Volkswagen Golf R by 0.1 seconds and the #3 ranked 2015 Volkswagen Golf GTI by 0.1 seconds.Whether you are behind the wheel of one of these cars or happen to spot one in the next lane over, think twice before you step on the gas pedal. In a race from 0-60 mph between 2015 Volkswagen GTI vs. 2012 Volkswagen Golf R, you would WIN by 0.1 seconds!If you happen to roll up next to another Volkswagen, be sure you know what you’re up against. Find out where your car stands among the top 10 fastest cars from 2015.
volkswagen sports car 4

Volkswagen Sports Car

Volkswagen partnered with Daimler AG and other companies to market the BlueTec clean diesel technology on cars and trucks from Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen, and other companies and brands. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, four of the ten most fuel-efficient vehicles available for sale in the U.S. are powered by Volkswagen diesel engines. Volkswagen has offered a number of its vehicles with a TDI (Turbocharged Direct Injection) engine, which lends class-leading fuel economy to several models. They were a three-way tie for 8th (TDI Beetle, TDI Golf, TDI Jetta) and ninth, the TDI Jetta Wagon. In addition, all Volkswagen TDI diesel engines produced from 1996 to 2006 can be driven on 100% biodiesel fuel. For the 2007 model year, however, strict U.S. government emissions regulations have forced VW to drop most diesels from their U.S. engine lineup, but a new lineup of diesel engines compatible to U.S. standards returned to the American market starting with Model Year 2009. These post-2009 Clean Diesel engines are limited to running on 5% (B5) biodiesel only to maintain Volkswagen’s warranty. Volkswagen long resisted adding a SUV to its lineup, but relented with the introduction of the Touareg, made in partnership with Porsche, while they worked on the Porsche Cayenne and later the Audi Q7. Though acclaimed as a fine handling vehicle, the Touareg has been a modest seller at best, and it has been criticised by auto reviewers for its absence of a third-row seat, the relatively poor fuel economy, and the high vehicle mass. VW set plans to add a compact SUV with styling influences from the “Concept A” concept vehicle introduced at the 2006 Geneva Auto Show, and on 20 July 2006, VW announced that the new vehicle, called the Tiguan.
volkswagen sports car 5

Volkswagen Sports Car

On 13 August, Volkswagen Aktiengesellschaft’s Supervisory Board signed the agreement to create an integrated automotive group with Porsche led by Volkswagen. The initial decision was for Volkswagen to take a 42.0% stake in Porsche AG by the end of 2009, and it would also see the family shareholders selling the automobile trading business of Porsche Holding Salzburg to Volkswagen. In October 2009 however, Volkswagen announced that its percentage in Porsche would be 49.9% for a cost of €3.9 billion (the 42.0% deal would have cost €3.3 billion). On 1 March 2011, Volkswagen has finalized the purchase of Porsche Holding Salzburg (PHS), Germany’s leading specialty automobile distributor, for €3.3 billion ($4.55 billion).
volkswagen sports car 6

Volkswagen Sports Car

Volkswagen has always had a close relationship with Porsche, the Zuffenhausen-based sports car manufacturer founded in 1931 by Ferdinand Porsche, the original Volkswagen designer and Volkswagen company co-founder, hired by Adolf Hitler for the project. The first Porsche car, the Porsche 64 of 1938, used many components from the Volkswagen Beetle. The 1948 Porsche 356 continued using many Volkswagen components, including a tuned engine, gearbox and suspension.
volkswagen sports car 7

Volkswagen Sports Car

VW’s Sport Coupe Concept GTE, which debuts at the Geneva auto show, is an ambitiously futuristic four-seat concept with styling that hints strongly at the next CC sedan. In the automaker’s words, this is “a coupe with four doors and a hatchback,” which makes sense only if you’re accepting of this decade’s insistence on dismantling the definition of “coupe.” It’s also a plug-in hybrid with significantly sporty intentions and an electrically enabled all-wheel-drive setup, as well as a somewhat eerie-sounding navigation system that reads the driver’s emotions. Gots the Electricity The GTE portion of the show car’s name indicates a plug-in-hybrid drivetrain—as it also does for the Golf GTE, the Passat GTE, and January’s GTE SUV concept—that VW says could feasibly be spread across all vehicle classes. With a gasoline engine augmented by a pair of electric motors, the Sport Coupe Concept GTE promises impressive performance and enviable fuel-economy targets (although these latter numbers are no doubt derived from the favorable Euro test cycle for PHEVs). A turbocharged and direct-injected 3.0-liter V-6 cranks out 295 horses and a prodigious 369 lb-ft of torque through a six-speed DSG transmission, while a 54-hp electric motor is integrated into the gearbox to augment front-wheel power. A separate, 114-hp motor drives the rear axle. The electric motors are fed juice by a lithium-ion battery pack tucked into the car’s center tunnel, explaining the four-seat layout. (The previous CC launched with a four-place interior, but VW was forced to later add a rear bench.) VW says that combined output clocks in at 374 horsepower and allows a 0-to-62-mph sprint of five seconds flat. Top speed is cited as 155 mph. An electric-only cruising range of “at least 32 miles,” a combined fuel-economy rating of a claimed 118 mpg, and a total driving range in excess of 745 miles highlight the car’s eco cred. The hybrid drivetrain offers the usual variety of drive modes. Electric-only mode sees the gas engine decoupled from the driveline, and the car is powered solely by the rear 114-horse motor. Other modes include a default hybrid setting, battery-charge hold mode, and GTE mode, which promises top performance. Particularly nifty is the so-called “electric driveshaft” functionality of the all-wheel-drive system. With the battery pack taking up the space normally reserved for a traditional driveshaft, the transmission-bound front electric motor generates power for the rear motor, allowing AWD operation no matter the state of the battery’s charge. Going To Be Evocative Yet for all that, the most important takeaway from the car is its exterior styling. Volkswagen has a reputation for understated, premium-looking designs, not necessarily shapes you’d call “evocative.” The CC changed that a bit, but it still wasn’t particularly brazen even after its recent freshening. The Sport Coupe Concept GTE eschews the current CC’s roundish motifs for a more angular, squinty-eyed, square-shouldered aesthetic. It’s a bold and nearly production-ready design. The nose, in particular, is courageous in ways we’re not used to seeing from Volkswagen. The broad grille’s top two bars flow into the headlights, actually becoming illuminated tubes that serve as DRLs and turn signals thanks to amber and white LEDs. The lower air intakes are framed by C-shaped LED lighting, a visual indicator of GTE plug-in-hybrid motivation. While the 21-inch wheels and 265-width tires might be more show car than production vehicle, the overall layout of the long, sweeping four-seat hatchback is what you’ll see in dealerships. Gadgets to Excite Inside, the Sport Coupe Concept GTE flexes VW’s in-car tech muscles. The driver faces a 12.3-inch display for an instrument panel whose gauges “appear to hover in virtual space.” A 10.1-inch center-stack touch screen with capacitive control sliders handles the HVAC and infotainment duties up front, while the individual rear seats are separated by a console featuring a 12.3-inch touch screen that gives rear-seat passengers control of their individual climate zones, navigation, and the infotainment appearing on the front headrests. Then there’s a feature that’s both future-cool and mildly eerie: The navigation system can adjust its suggestions based on the driver’s mood. In a statement that distinctly brings to mind the Borg, “For the first time, Volkswagen is interfacing the car’s electronics directly with the driver,” the automaker explains. The envisioned setup monitors the driver’s biometric data via a wearable fitness tracker like a smartwatch or a Fitbit. By analyzing the driver’s vital functions, the car’s navigation selects a route to suit the human’s emotional state—perhaps an engaging country road if you’re feeling frisky or a gentler route if you’re feeling relaxed. “Time and distance are secondary factors here,” VW says. Thankfully, VW points out that you can opt-out of sharing your emotional status with your car’s dashboard. The outgoing CC was based on previous-generation European Passat underpinnings—it has little to nothing to do with the U.S.-market Passat—and that will continue moving forward. As with the recently redesigned Euro-market Passat, the foundation for this concept and the future CC is the VW Group’s MQB modular transverse-engine platform, which can underpin everything from tiny city cars to three-row SUVs. The Sport Coupe Concept falls on the larger end of the spectrum with its 118.9-inch wheelbase. While the two cars are unrelated, for reference, that’s 8.5 inches more than the American Passat, even though the concept and the U.S. Passat are roughly the same length. This, as well as a low roof, gives the Sport Coupe Concept a deeply evocative low-and-wide stance with the wheels pushed out to the very corners of its footprint. VW also promises 17 cubic feet of cargo space, a stat rarely specified on concept vehicles. Expect the next-generation CC—which will be sold here as a premium model above our Passat—to be revealed by the end of this year and go on sale sometime in 2016 as a 2017 model. Pricing will be a notch or two above that of the current CC’s $35,000-ish starting sticker. And if VW manages to make it look largely like this concept, we have a feeling there will be plenty of folks willing to pony up for what is essentially a fancy family sedan. Er, coupe. View Photos View Photos

Published on Aug 6, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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