teen car crash

teen car crash

Teen Car Crash

How can deaths and injuries resulting from crashes involving teen drivers be prevented? There are proven methods to helping teens become safer drivers. Seat Belts Of the teens (aged 16-19) who died in passenger vehicle crashes in 2014 approximately 53% were not wearing a seat belt at the time of the crash.2 Research shows that seat belts reduce serious crash-related injuries and deaths by about half.14 Not Drinking & Driving Enforcing minimum legal drinking age laws and zero blood-alcohol tolerance laws for drivers under age 21 are recommended. Graduated Driver Licensing Programs (GDL) Driving is a complex skill, one that must be practiced to be learned well. Teenagers’ lack of driving experience, together with risk-taking behavior, puts them at heightened risk for crashes. The need for skill-building and driving supervision for new drivers is the basis for graduated driver licensing programs, which exist in all US states and Washington, DC. GDL provides longer practice periods, limits driving under high risk conditions for newly licensed drivers, and requires greater participation of parents in their teens’ learning-to-drive. Research suggests that the more comprehensive GDL programs are associated with reductions of 26% to 41% in fatal crashes and reductions of 16% to 22% in overall crashes, among 16-year-old drivers. When parents know their state’s GDL laws, they can help enforce the laws and, in effect, help keep their teen drivers safe. Eight Danger Zones Make sure your young driver is aware of the leading causes of teen crashes: Driver inexperience Driving with teen passengers Nighttime driving Not using seat belts Distracted driving Drowsy driving Reckless driving Impaired driving Learn what research has shown parents can do to keep teen drivers safe from each of these risks. Learn More
teen car crash 1

Teen Car Crash

Before you hand over the car keys to your teenager, know the facts. Auto accidents are the leading cause of death for teens ages 15 to 20. When teen drivers ride with other passengers, their risk of being in a fatal car crash doubles. Overall, teenagers underestimate or are unable to recognize hazardous driving conditions.
teen car crash 2

Teen Car Crash

Learn more about the effects of blood alcohol concentration. What factors put teen drivers at risk? Teens are more likely than older drivers to underestimate dangerous situations or not be able to recognize hazardous situations.7 Teens are also more likely than adults to make critical decision errors that lead to serious crashes.8 Teens are more likely than older drivers to speed and allow shorter headways (the distance from the front of one vehicle to the front of the next). The presence of male teenage passengers increases the likelihood of this risky driving behavior.9 In 2014, 50% of teen deaths from motor vehicle crashes occurred between 3 p.m. and midnight and 53% occurred on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday.2 Compared with other age groups, teens have among the lowest rates of seat belt use. In 2015, only 61% of high school students reported they always wear seat belts when riding with someone else.10 At all levels of blood alcohol concentration (BAC), the risk of involvement in a motor vehicle crash is greater for teens than for older drivers.11 Among male drivers between 15 and 20 years of age who were involved in fatal crashes in 2014, 36% were speeding at the time of the crash10 and 24% had been drinking.12 In 2014, 17% of drivers aged 16 to 20 involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes had a BAC of .08% or higher.13 In a national survey conducted in 2015, 20% of teens reported that, within the previous month, they had ridden with a driver who had been drinking alcohol. Among students who drove, 8% reported having driven after drinking alcohol within the same one-month period.10 In 2014, 64% of drivers aged 15 to 20 who were killed in motor vehicle crashes after drinking and driving were not wearing a seat belt.12
teen car crash 3

Teen Car Crash

Local Teen lost control of his car before fatal crash in Maryland, police say The inside track on Washington politics. Be the first to know about new stories from PowerPost. Sign up to follow, and we’ll e-mail you free updates as they’re published. You’ll receive free e-mail news updates each time a new story is published. You’re all set! Sign up *Invalid email address Got it Got it
teen car crash 4

Teen Car Crash

But over time, something about the circumstances of Hannah’s crash irked him. He’s an emergency medical technician and has seen his share of highway wrecks. A sudden impact on a highway can kill, but the end terminal is supposed to crumple, dissipating the force from a crash and making the collision survivable.
teen car crash 5

Teen Car Crash

The risk of motor vehicle crashes is higher among 16-19-year-olds than among any other age group. In fact, per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are nearly three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in a fatal crash.2
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Teen Car Crash

A teenage driver was streaming to Facebook Live while she drove along a Pennsylvania highway just before a tractor-trailer rear ended her vehicle after midnight Tuesday, killing her and a passenger in a fiery wreck. Brooke Miranda Hughes, 18, was behind the wheel on Interstate 380 near Tobyhanna as she live-streamed her car ride with 19-year-old friend, Chaniya Morrison-Toomey, who can be heard saying “Are you going live?” in the now-deleted footage, according to the Associated Press. Before Hughes could answer, bright lights flash inside the car and sounds of screeching tires can be heard, followed by seven-minutes of blackness, the Scranton Times-Tribune reported. The teens were declared dead at the scene and were driving on a spare tire, according to Pennsylvania State Trooper Dave Peters. WNEP At the end of the eight-minute video, a man is heard speaking and a blurry, bearded face can be seen before it ends. Michael Jay Parks, the driver of the tractor-trailer, was unhurt in the deadly accident. Investigators told the Scranton Times-Tribune that it is too early to determine if Parks will be charged. The Monroe County Coroner’s Office conducted autopsies on the teens on Wednesday. In their autopsy reports, it states investigators could not visually identify Hughes and Morrison-Toomey due to the car burning. State Police said the Facebook Live video will be used as evidence in their investigation. “People watching Live video can report potential violations of our Community Standards, and we will take the appropriate action,” Andrea Saul, a Facebook spokeswoman, explained to the Scranton Times-Tribune. “We also encourage people to contact law enforcement if they see a Live stream in which someone is in danger.” A GoFundMe page has been set up by friends and family of Morrison-Toomey to pay for her funeral expenses. Show Full Article
teen car crash 7

Teen Car Crash

A teenage driver was streaming to Facebook Live while she drove along a Pennsylvania highway just before a tractor-trailer rear ended her vehicle after midnight Tuesday, killing her and a passenger in a fiery wreck. Brooke Miranda Hughes, 18, was behind the wheel on Interstate 380 near Tobyhanna as she live-streamed her car ride with 19-year-old friend, Chaniya Morrison-Toomey, who can be heard saying “Are you going live?” in the now-deleted footage, according to the Associated Press. Before Hughes could answer, bright lights flash inside the car and sounds of screeching tires can be heard, followed by seven-minutes of blackness, the Scranton Times-Tribune reported. The teens were declared dead at the scene and were driving on a spare tire, according to Pennsylvania State Trooper Dave Peters. WNEP At the end of the eight-minute video, a man is heard speaking and a blurry, bearded face can be seen before it ends. Michael Jay Parks, the driver of the tractor-trailer, was unhurt in the deadly accident. Investigators told the Scranton Times-Tribune that it is too early to determine if Parks will be charged. The Monroe County Coroner’s Office conducted autopsies on the teens on Wednesday. In their autopsy reports, it states investigators could not visually identify Hughes and Morrison-Toomey due to the car burning. State Police said the Facebook Live video will be used as evidence in their investigation. “People watching Live video can report potential violations of our Community Standards, and we will take the appropriate action,” Andrea Saul, a Facebook spokeswoman, explained to the Scranton Times-Tribune. “We also encourage people to contact law enforcement if they see a Live stream in which someone is in danger.” A GoFundMe page has been set up by friends and family of Morrison-Toomey to pay for her funeral expenses.
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The 17-year-old had been to a costume party the night before the crash and stayed over at a friend’s house. The next morning, the pair was on Interstate 75, headed to school.
teen car crash 9

Shortly before 10:30 p.m. Tuesday, as he was heading home from work at Pizza Hut, the Gwynn Park High School junior lost control of the Camry and hit a tree in a crash that killed him, according to police and family.
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Norman White, 17, was on his way home from work Tuesday when he died in a crash. White was a Gwynn Park High School student and member of the varsity football team. (Family photo)
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Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens.1 Fortunately, teen motor vehicle crashes are preventable, and proven strategies can improve the safety of young drivers on the road.

Published on Jun 24, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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