scion sports car

scion sports car

Scion Sports Car

Performance Summary Test drivers find that the Scion FR-S’ four-cylinder engine lacks the overall power and eager acceleration that many people associate with sports cars, although they still find the engine responsive. The standard six-speed manual transmission draws reviewer praise for its smoothness, and critics say the available six-speed automatic has timely shifts. The FR-S gets an EPA-estimated 22/30 mpg city/highway, which is above average for the class. Critics report that the FR-S handles curvy roads well, with reactive steering and nimble handling that make for a fun driving experience. Some complain that the suspension delivers a rough ride over uneven road surfaces. Interior Summary The 2016 FR-S has a driver-oriented cabin that features mostly hard plastics throughout, according to automotive writers. They praise the front seats for their comfort and supportiveness, even during long drives. Many critics call the trunk and back seats undersized, although they note that cargo space is better with the rear seats folded down. Standard features include a rearview camera, a USB port, HD Radio, Bluetooth and an eight-speaker Pioneer audio system with a 7-inch touch screen. Scion’s voice-activated BeSpoke audio system with navigation and smartphone integration is available. Reviewers praise the audio system’s interface, noting that it now resembles the user-friendly infotainment systems found in other Toyota vehicles. “… the 2016 FR-S is a strong competitor for the fun-while-driving crowd, combining the light weight and affordability of the all-new Mazda MX-5 Miata and the hardtop feel of 6-cylinder versions of the new Ford Mustang, all wrapped in sheet metal that’s the most aggressive ever from Scion.” — Kelley Blue Book “The small sport coupe is a small niche in the U.S. car market, but for shoppers who want nimble handling, peppy performance and good looks in a small package — and can’t abide the thought of four doors — Scion’s updated 2016 FR-S remains one of the best choices available. It’s a back-to-basics, lightweight sports car with rear-wheel drive, excellent balance and an affordable price.” — Edmunds “The typical sports car drawbacks apply, including a firm ride and limited space, but they’re a small price to pay for the FR-S’ seriously fun driving experience.” — Left Lane News “The Scion FR-S is almost in a class by itself. It has respectable performance credentials, a fun-to-drive personality, and surprisingly modest pricing.” — Consumer Guide “This car is for those who find more thrills in corners than on straightaways, and it’s refreshing indeed to find a reasonably priced modern-day sports car with such a focused mission.” — AutoTrader Other Cars to Consider The Nissan 370Z delivers ample power and athletic handling while still providing a supple ride, according to test drivers. They note that the cabin is quiet, and the 370Z’s available features are easy to operate. The 370Z is also available as a convertible. The Mazda MX-5 Miata is a soft-top convertible and gets great fuel economy. Automotive writers say that what the Miata lacks in power, it more than makes up for with agile handling and precise steering, as well as a comfortable ride. Compare the FR-S, 370Z and Miata » Details: 2016 Scion FR-S The four-seat 2016 Scion FR-S features standard rear-wheel drive, a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine and a six-speed manual transmission. A six-speed automatic transmission is available. The FR-S comes in one trim and only sees minor changes for the 2016 model year. As a result, this overview uses applicable reviews and research from the 2013 through 2016 model years. See 2016 Scion FR-S specs »
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Scion Sports Car

The Scion and Subaru never had an abundance of grip at their contact patches, but the Bridgestones—still sized 215/45R-17—simply feel like they have less of it to offer. Combined with the Scion’s suspension changes, the latest FR-S is more tail-happy than ever. While that makes the car a hoot to play with at lower speeds, as well as a great learning tool for beginners, less traction means less outright performance.
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Scion Sports Car

As part of the 10th anniversary of the Scion marque, 2,500 units of “10 Series” FR-S models were released by Scion for model year 2014. They were painted in Silver Ignition and fitted with extra equipment, including HID headlights, automatic climate control, push button start, illuminated exterior badges plus shifter knob.
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Scion Sports Car

When the Scion brand ended, the FR-S became the Toyota 86. Regardless, the FR-S offers excellent driving dynamics. Only one engine was available: a 200-hp 2.0-liter flat-four. A six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic were the transmission choices. The manual shifts with a solid, no-nonsense feel, while the paddle-shift automatic is quick and responsive. The cabin is cramped and plasticky, but the FR-S is very agile, which endears it to enthusiasts. Jump to Instrumented Test – 2016 Scion FR-S Manual
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Scion Sports Car

Once you’ve reconciled yourself with grabbing the flat four by the nape of its neck and squeezing for all it’s worth, the FR-S becomes a second skin. Nimble, light (by modern standards), and incredibly neutral in its balance, the Scion FR-S captures the essence of what a sports car should be: honest, inexpensive fun. 
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Scion Sports Car

This little Scion touts the brand’s economical and relatively practical qualities, but they’re not necessarily the focus for the FR-S. Instead, this Subaru-built, Toyota-designed sports coupe is engineered for fun above all else.
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Scion Sports Car

Fuel economy for a lightweight, low power sports coupe should be predictably better. The manual-transmission Scion FR-S is rated by the EPA at 22 mpg city, 30 highway, 25 combined, which is good—but should be better.
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Scion Sports Car

Although Scion and Subaru have separately tweaked their models over the years, most of what we gleaned from our 40,000-mile test of a 2013 Subaru BRZ still holds true for both cars. They continue to share the same 200-hp 2.0-liter flat-four engine and lightweight, rear-wheel-drive chassis, as well as their sleek bodywork and driver-focused interiors. These are still very fun and affordable sports cars, albeit ones with minimal refinement and practicality.
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Test drivers find that the Scion FR-S’ four-cylinder engine lacks the overall power and eager acceleration that many people associate with sports cars, although they still find the engine responsive. The standard six-speed manual transmission draws reviewer praise for its smoothness, and critics say the available six-speed automatic has timely shifts.
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Simple surfaces give the FR-S classic proportions. Details at the nose and tail provide a modern, aerodynamic look to the car. Inside, the Scion FR-S is basic, but well-built and handsome—if not quite beautiful. 
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The 86 “boxer” side badge appears on all Toyota and Scion versions of the car, but not the Subaru BRZ. Aside from badging, the main differences between the 86/GT86 and the BRZ are the front grilles and bumper bars. The rest, including the 17 inch alloy wheels, are shared.
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For 2016, Scion has given the FR-S its first meaningful update. Changes are mostly minor but include some visual tweaks and new trim for the cabin, a couple new colors, a new standard audio system, and the addition of a rearview camera. The new equipment comes with a slight price bump—about $400.
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On the equipment front, there’s not much to talk about: the Scion FR-S only has a few choices to be made. Fortunately, those choices include available premium audio with apps capability, while standard gear includes Bluetooth, keyless entry, and climate control.
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Driving enthusiasts have a lot of options these days, from the new 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata all the way up to track-focused versions of our favorites, such as the Porsche 911 GT3 RS. The Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ twins still exist in the lower end of the spectrum price-wise. Both earned 10Best nods upon their debut for 2013, but the pair’s sales quickly fell off once the initial rush of enthusiasts got their keys. Here we take a look at the 2016 FR-S and the incremental improvements Toyota has made in an attempt to keep it relevant with sporting buyers.
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The Scion’s changes for 2016 are modest and focus on dressing up the previously drab interior with silver accents on the steering wheel, console, dash, and doors. Also new are a standard backup camera and Pioneer infotainment system with a seven-inch touch-screen display. The latter once again has an aftermarket look and feel, but its features and usability are significantly better than the previous unit’s infuriating setup. Similarly, the brighter trim is a welcome improvement on the early FR-S’s all-black décor, even though it does nothing to address the excessive road and engine noise that still invades the cabin. Fortunately—and most important—the FR-S’s primary controls remain ideally arranged and rich with feedback for spirited driving.
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The level of aftermarket support remains the FR-S’s most exciting feature, with virtually limitless modifications available, including Scion’s own dealer-installed Toyota Racing Development engine and suspension upgrades. While the latest updates make the 2016 FR-S slightly more enjoyable without compromising it too much, simply fitting stickier rubber would make a greater impact on its character, whether that’s from the factory or something you opt to do for yourself.
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Standard features include a rearview camera, a USB port, HD Radio, Bluetooth and an eight-speaker Pioneer audio system with a 7-inch touch screen. Scion’s voice-activated BeSpoke audio system with navigation and smartphone integration is available. Reviewers praise the audio system’s interface, noting that it now resembles the user-friendly infotainment systems found in other Toyota vehicles.

Published on May 29, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
| Jef-m
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