modern day muscle cars

modern day muscle cars

Modern Day Muscle Cars

Puts the “muscle” in muscle cars: “The Challenger R/T Scat Pack is fun in the most immature way imaginable with obnoxiously loud exhaust, a huge Shaker hood scoop and bright purple paint that lets everyone at the party know you've arrived,” Bruzek said. “It is unabashedly, unapologetically retro in everything it does,” Bragman said, “from the styling, to the interior, to the Shaker hood on the massive Hemi V-8.” It's “by far the most muscular looking of these muscle cars,” Robinson said, “but it is as comfortable as a big family sedan.” Wiesenfelder said, “the Challenger proves that style needn't sacrifice utility or comfort.” “Definitely fun,” Kadah said, “but definitely different than the others. The Challenger is still a muscle car while the Camaro and Mustang are sports cars.”
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Modern Day Muscle Cars

Muscle car is an American term used to refer to a variety of high-performance automobiles. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines muscle cars as “any of a group of American-made 2-door sports cars with powerful engines designed for high-performance driving.” A large V8 engine is fitted in a 2-door, rear wheel drive, family-style compact, mid-size or full-size car designed for four or more passengers. Sold at an affordable price, muscle cars are intended for street use and occasional drag racing. They are distinct from two-seat sports cars and expensive 2+2 GTs intended for high-speed touring and road racing.
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Modern Day Muscle Cars

In the United States, lightweight cars featuring high-performance engines were termed “supercar” before the classification of muscle car became popular. For example, the 1957 Rebel’s “potent mill turned the lightweight Rambler into a veritable supercar.” “From the mid-sixties to the mid-seventies, what we now think of as muscle cars were more commonly called ‘Supercars,’ often (though not always) spelled with a capital S.” This term described the “dragstrip bred” affordable mid-size cars of the 1960s and early 1970s that were equipped with large, powerful V8 engines and rear-wheel-drive. “In 1966, the supercar became an official industry trend” as the four domestic automakers “needed to cash in on the supercar market” with eye-catching, heart-stopping cars. Examples of the use of the supercar description for the early muscle models include the May 1965 Car Life road test of the Pontiac GTO along with how “Hurst puts American Motors into the Supercar club with the 390 Rogue” (the SC/Rambler) to fight in “the Supercar street racer gang” market segment. Moreover, the “SC” in the model name stood for “SuperCar”.
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Modern Day Muscle Cars

According to Muscle Cars, a book written by Peter Henshaw, a “muscle car” is “exactly what the name implies. It is a product of the American car industry adhering to the hot rodder’s philosophy of taking a small car and putting a large-displacement engine in it. The Muscle Car is Charles Atlas kicking sand in the face of the 98 horsepower weakling.” Henshaw further asserts that the muscle car was designed for straight-line speed, and did not have the “sophisticated chassis”, “engineering integrity”, or “lithe appearance” of European high-performance cars.
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Modern Day Muscle Cars

While the aging baby boom generation inspired the modern demand for classic-type American Muscle cars, the consumer market is much more diverse than it was in the 1960s and 1970s. Looking at modern muscle as a social trend, Ford and GM are the “innovators,” followed by baby boom males in their 50s as “early adopters.” The big bulge or “early majority” in the modern muscle movement comes from the men in their teens and early 20s. For these non-baby boomer consumers, the “cool” image is key. In the 1960s “a car was not quite a car unless punching the accelerator resulted in screaming tires and the landscape blurring around you…” according to Brent Staples of The New York Times. Fuel was cheap and the staple of drag racing counterculture was to be fast and loud. Now being “cool,” fuel efficient, and cost effective is all a part of the package. Instead of fuel guzzling V8 engines, you see V6 or turbocharged I4 models. Despite the reduction in power, Detroit is successfully selling this package. The Camaro and Challenger saw a 13% and 11% spike in sales during June 2011, which “outpaced” the growth in sales of all other passenger cars, according to Autodata.
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Modern Day Muscle Cars

The popularity and performance of muscle cars grew in the early 1960s, as Mopar (Dodge, Plymouth, and Chrysler) and Ford battled for supremacy in drag racing. The 1962 Dodge Dart 413 cu in (6.8 L) Max Wedge, for example, could run a 13-second 1/4-mile dragstrip at over 100 miles per hour (161 km/h). In 1961 Chevrolet introduced the SS package on the Impala for $53.80, with included an optional 409 cu in v8 with 425 hp and upgraded brakes, tires, and suspension. By 1964, General Motors’ lineup boasted Oldsmobile, Chevrolet, and Pontiac muscle cars, and Buick fielded a muscle car entry a year later. For 1964 and 1965, Ford had its 427 cu in (7.0 L) Thunderbolts, and Mopar unveiled the 426 cu in (7.0 L) Hemi engine. The Pontiac GTO was an option package that included Pontiac’s 389 cu in (6.4 L) V8 engine, floor-shifted transmission with Hurst shift linkage, and special trim. In 1966 the GTO became a model in its own right. The project, led by Pontiac division president John DeLorean, technically violated GM’s policy, limiting its smaller cars to 330 cu in (5.4 L) displacement, but the new model proved more popular than expected, and inspired GM and its competitors to produce numerous imitators.
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Modern Day Muscle Cars

The muscle car market segment was in high gear “until shifting social attitudes, crippling insurance rates, the Clean Air Act and the fuel crisis removed the cars from the market in the early 1970s.” The OPEC oil embargo led to price controls and gasoline rationing, as well as higher prices. “Muscle cars quickly became unaffordable and impractical for many people.” The automobile insurance industry also levied surcharges on all high-powered models, an added cost that put many muscle cars out of reach of their intended buyers. Simultaneously, efforts to combat air pollution focused Detroit’s attention on emissions control.
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Modern Day Muscle Cars

Americans always have loved muscle cars, and they love muscle cars with big V-8 engines. With gas below $2 a gallon in many places, there might not be a better time to buy one. We tested muscle cars with V-8 monsters. They provided plenty of thrills, plenty of noise and lots to talk about.
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We took a look at the fastest muscle cars that have graced the U.S. market in the 2010s. The list is largely the same as it could’ve been 47 years ago, with Mustang, Camaro, Challenger, Charger, and a few others, leading the lot. But thanks to huge advances in engineering, these cars are now safer, more reliable, and most importantly, more powerful than ever before. There may be some omissions, but we limited the list to cars that we could find precise and reliable test data for. Sports cars, including the Dodge Viper and Chevrolet Corvette, have also been omitted in order to stick closer to pure muscle car DNA.
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Page 1 of 12 Affordable muscle cars are the people’s champions, machines that might not have the all-around performance pedigree of a dedicated sports car but which still pack significant power under the hood. The democratization of inexpensive muscle has reached a fever pitch over the course of the last decade or so, with anywhere between 300 and 500 horsepower accessible to gearheads at surprisingly reasonable prices both on the used and new market. In recognition of this golden age of cheap performance we’ve put together a list of the 10 best affordable muscle cars money can buy, split between 5 brand new 2015 models and 5 recent used vehicles. Let’s see how much tire smoke per dollar you can get on the modern market.
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Affordable muscle cars are the people’s champions, machines that might not have the all-around performance pedigree of a dedicated sports car but which still pack significant power under the hood. The democratization of inexpensive muscle has reached a fever pitch over the course of the last decade or so, with anywhere between 300 and 500 horsepower accessible to gearheads at surprisingly reasonable prices both on the used and new market. In recognition of this golden age of cheap performance we’ve put together a list of the 10 best affordable muscle cars money can buy, split between 5 brand new 2015 models and 5 recent used vehicles. Let’s see how much tire smoke per dollar you can get on the modern market.
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Forget the ‘60s — we are currently living in the best era for V8 muscle cars that the world has ever known. From high-end German luxury models, to home-grown Detroit iron, to surprise entries from England and Korea, it’s never been easier to walk into a dealership and drive home in a V8 muscle car that will rip down the quarter mile with ease and terrify your neighbors with its exultory exhaust note. You typically have to pay a premium for V8 power these days — both on the window sticker and at the fuel pump — but the end result is so very, very worth it. Let’s take a quick look at 10 of the best V8 muscle cars you can buy.
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Photo Credit: General Motors Page 1 of 12 Forget the ‘60s — we are currently living in the best era for V8 muscle cars that the world has ever known. From high-end German luxury models, to home-grown Detroit iron, to surprise entries from England and Korea, it’s never been easier to walk into a dealership and drive home in a V8 muscle car that will rip down the quarter mile with ease and terrify your neighbors with its exultory exhaust note. You typically have to pay a premium for V8 power these days — both on the window sticker and at the fuel pump — but the end result is so very, very worth it. Let’s take a quick look at 10 of the best V8 muscle cars you can buy.

Published on Aug 17, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
| Jef-m
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