lego car crash

lego car crash

Lego Car Crash

GIF Everyone loves Lego, right? Of course you do; you’re not some kind of monster. I’m sure that anyone who’s ever built a Lego car has wondered, at least in passing, say, wouldn’t it be great if I could just build a real car out of Lego? Just in case the weight and cost calculations didn’t wise you up about why that would be a terrible idea, this crash test video should.The Lego Porsche crash test was performed by ADAC, essentially Germany’s version of the AAA. ADAC, it seems, occasionally likes to have a little fun with the crash-testing, hence the test of the $300, 2700+ piece Lego Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS.The Lego Porsche was crash-tested on a special sub-scale track built at the at the ADAC Technikzentrum, and the car reached speeds of about 28 MPH. That’s pretty good for a Lego car.AdvertisementWhile the test looks pretty disastrous, when you really look at the aftermath, the Lego car held up better than you’d expect. An ADEC crash-tester summarized the damage:“The result was impressive and different than expected. “The chassis of the car had no problems with the high speed, and there were very little damaged stones on impact. It was almost exclusively the click connections between the components.”So, that makes sense. The individual Lego components were just fine, but they were mostly dislodged by the force of the impact. That means, thankfully, the car can be rebuilt. Anyone who’s ever dropped an entire weekend’s worth of Lego-labor can confirm this. Man, I hope the minifigs are okayWhile the result looks pretty disastrous, rebuilding is far easier than in our silly metal cars. Plus, in a world of Lego cars, you could staff body shops with 8-year-olds, who have much lower labor costs.I bet this test has been done before by miserable people with slippery hands We Need This Flying Group B Peugeot Lego Set Right NowFull-Size 1964 Lego Ford Mustang Is Amazing But Hiding a Shameful SecretI Can't Wait To Pretend To Buy This Lego Ford GT And GT40 Set For My Kids
lego car crash 1

Lego Car Crash

Car fans and plastic-brick fans alike welcomed the introduction of the stunning Lego Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS kit last year. Now you can watch with a mix of awe, horror and wonderment as all 2,704 pieces of that pristine model ram into a wall for a toy-sized crash test. More Lego Lego launches massive NASA Saturn V Apollo rocket set ‘Not uncomfortable’ Lego dress fashioned from 12,000 pieces The crash test video, released on Tuesday, comes from German automobile club ADAC. It kicks off with an unboxing and a time-lapse of the build, which is no easy feat. Lego suggests the kit is best for builders age 16 and over. The ADAC’s test track is a miniature version of a real crash-test setup. Luxuriate in the slow-motion footage of doom as the Porsche hurtles towards a wall and then splits into its individual Lego components. See the dance of destruction from every possible angle. The ADAC notes that the pieces themselves held up well, but the connection points where the bricks click together were the weak spots. Let’s just say that Lego cars aren’t designed with crumple zones. 15 15 epic Lego creations that will blow your mind (pictures) Share your voice 0 comments Tags Toys and Games Lego Porsche
lego car crash 2

Lego Car Crash

Samuel Reiman @samuelreiman May 23, 2017 at 1:33p ET 0Shares I confess I’ve never much been into LEGO. Instead, I played with a lot of K’NEX growing up. One of my odd hobbies as a child was making K’NEX cars and smashing them into walls. Well it seems some people at the German automobile club ADAC wanted to try the same thing with LEGO. Only, instead of just clipping about 30 pieces together like I did and just calling it a “car,” these guys put 2,700 building blocks together to create a LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS with functional steering, a dual clutch gearbox and a box motor with moving pistons worth 300 Euros. Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? This sounds like the sort of thing that ought to be kept safe inside of a glass case. Instead, however, ADAC decided to crash test it to show us how bad off we’d all be if our cars were made out of LEGO. Although, to its credit, the trunk definitely seemed to hold up well. 0Shares auto
lego car crash 3

Lego Car Crash

I confess I’ve never much been into LEGO. Instead, I played with a lot of K’NEX growing up. One of my odd hobbies as a child was making K’NEX cars and smashing them into walls. Well it seems some people at the German automobile club ADAC wanted to try the same thing with LEGO. Only, instead of just clipping about 30 pieces together like I did and just calling it a “car,” these guys put 2,700 building blocks together to create a LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS with functional steering, a dual clutch gearbox and a box motor with moving pistons worth 300 Euros. Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? This sounds like the sort of thing that ought to be kept safe inside of a glass case. Instead, however, ADAC decided to crash test it to show us how bad off we’d all be if our cars were made out of LEGO. Although, to its credit, the trunk definitely seemed to hold up well.
lego car crash 4

Lego Car Crash

In what has to be the most compellingly watchable and brilliantly simple video we’ve seen in a long time, German safety outfit ADAC has crash-tested a Porsche 911 GT3 RS… made of Lego. The block-built Lego Technic model, which retails at £260 from the Lego Shop (£176 from Tesco), is slammed into a plate of something solid at 28.5mph and the results are rather dramatic. This 3m15s video only features a single crash (who’d want to rebuild the car?), filmed from multiple angles to give you a glorious repeat performance of the impact to the perfectly-selected backing of Strauss’ Blue Danube Waltz. Who says the Germans don’t have a sense of humour?
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Lego Car Crash

So the German motorists’ association assembled one of Lego’s spendy, hyperdetailed 1:8-scale 911 GT3 RS kits, then set up a miniature impact run where the car was subjected to a 28-mph crash test. That’s a scale speed (a sales tactic beloved by slot-car manufacturers of the 1980s) of 224 mph, significantly beyond the real car’s under-200-mph maximum velocity.
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Lego Car Crash

The crash test video, released on Tuesday, comes from German automobile club ADAC. It kicks off with an unboxing and a time-lapse of the build, which is no easy feat. Lego suggests the kit is best for builders age 16 and over. The ADAC’s test track is a miniature version of a real crash-test setup.
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Lego Car Crash

“The result was impressive and different than expected,” ADAC said. “The chassis of the car had no problems with the high speed, and there were very little damaged stones on impact. It was almost exclusively the click connections between the components.” So not surprisingly, the LEGO car could be rebuilt, which is pretty much the case with any LEGO creation that gets dropped or destroyed.
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Yikes. Not only has the passenger compartment completely caved in the front, but the exploding shower of Lego bricks upon impact is sure to pose a risk to any people mice hanging out near the car when it crashes.Shame. I thought we’d finally found an orange, winged sports car that the wives of the world would approve of. Now, though, I’m not sure it’ll pass muster, given the Lego GT3’s dismal safety rating. Well, that, and the fact that it’s a $300 set of Legos.
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So, that makes sense. The individual Lego components were just fine, but they were mostly dislodged by the force of the impact. That means, thankfully, the car can be rebuilt. Anyone who’s ever dropped an entire weekend’s worth of Lego-labor can confirm this.
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Thanks to the German auto safety group ADAC and c’t magazine, you can behold said spectacle in stunning slow motion. After dressing up the 1:8 scale Porsche in traditional crash test attire, the sadistic Lego enthusiasts sent the car hurdling towards a wall at over 28 miles per hour. It doesn’t take a genius to guess what happened next.
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Car fans and plastic-brick fans alike welcomed the introduction of the stunning Lego Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS kit last year. Now you can watch with a mix of awe, horror and wonderment as all 2,704 pieces of that pristine model ram into a wall for a toy-sized crash test.
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About a year ago, Lego released a scale replica Porsche 911 GT3 RS. It’s a remarkable set, with almost 3,000 pieces and a fully functional steering and transmission system. It’s basically just a miniature version of the real car. So naturally, it had to be subjected to a crash test.
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Needless to say, the car does not fare well. It is made of Legos after all, and shatters into a thousand tiny pieces immediately upon impact. It’s still an entertaining crash, but the Lego Porsche isn’t going to be passing any safety tests. At least it’s a lot cheaper to wreck this version.

Published on Aug 16, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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