in a car crash wearing a seatbelt

in a car crash wearing a seatbelt

In A Car Crash Wearing A Seatbelt

Heavy traffic in Nigeria’s commercial capital Lagos, March 7, 2013. Nigerian minister James Ocholi was killed in a road accident on Sunday because his driver was speeding and Ocholi was not wearing a seatbelt, an investigation has found. Akintunde Akinleye/Reuters World Nigeria James Ocholi Muhammadu BuhariA Nigerian minister who was killed in a car accident died because his driver was speeding and the minister was not wearing a seatbelt, an investigation has found.James Ocholi, the late minister of state for labor and productivity, died in an accident on the Kaduna-Abuja highway in central Nigeria on Sunday. His death was mourned by Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, who referred to Ocholi as “an accomplished and patriotic Nigerian, who was keen to accept the call to service at a time his country needed him.”An investigation by Nigeria’s road safety agency found that Ocholi’s driver Taiwo Elegbede, who was also killed in the crash, had been speeding when one of the car’s tires burst, according to Premium Times. The investigation also found that Elegbede was not registered in the agency’s database as a licensed driver and that the one of the tires on Ocholi’s car was underinflated. There was no means of communication between Ocholi’s car and a backup vehicle, meaning that Elegbede could not be forewarned about the underinflated tire before it burst. Subscribe to Newsweek from $1 per week Ocholi and his son Joshua died instantly in the crash, while his wife Blessing Fatima Ocholi died later in hospital. The investigation found that Ocholi and his son were ejected from the vehicle because they were not wearing seatbelts.The findings were presented by a representative of the Federal Road Safety Corps (FRSC) to a cabinet meeting at the presidential villa in Nigeria’s capital Abuja. The FRSC called on President Buhari to lead a campaign on road safety in Nigeria.Nigeria has a high rate of road accidents due to the country’s poor infrastructure and variable standards of driving. An estimated 36,000 people died in road traffic accidents in 2013—about 20.5 people for every 100,000 members of the population—according to a 2015 World Health Organization report on road safety. 
in a car crash wearing a seatbelt 1

In A Car Crash Wearing A Seatbelt

A Nigerian minister who was killed in a car accident died because his driver was speeding and the minister was not wearing a seatbelt, an investigation has found.James Ocholi, the late minister of state for labor and productivity, died in an accident on the Kaduna-Abuja highway in central Nigeria on Sunday. His death was mourned by Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, who referred to Ocholi as “an accomplished and patriotic Nigerian, who was keen to accept the call to service at a time his country needed him.”An investigation by Nigeria’s road safety agency found that Ocholi’s driver Taiwo Elegbede, who was also killed in the crash, had been speeding when one of the car’s tires burst, according to Premium Times. The investigation also found that Elegbede was not registered in the agency’s database as a licensed driver and that the one of the tires on Ocholi’s car was underinflated. There was no means of communication between Ocholi’s car and a backup vehicle, meaning that Elegbede could not be forewarned about the underinflated tire before it burst. Subscribe to Newsweek from $1 per week Ocholi and his son Joshua died instantly in the crash, while his wife Blessing Fatima Ocholi died later in hospital. The investigation found that Ocholi and his son were ejected from the vehicle because they were not wearing seatbelts.The findings were presented by a representative of the Federal Road Safety Corps (FRSC) to a cabinet meeting at the presidential villa in Nigeria’s capital Abuja. The FRSC called on President Buhari to lead a campaign on road safety in Nigeria.Nigeria has a high rate of road accidents due to the country’s poor infrastructure and variable standards of driving. An estimated 36,000 people died in road traffic accidents in 2013—about 20.5 people for every 100,000 members of the population—according to a 2015 World Health Organization report on road safety. 
in a car crash wearing a seatbelt 2

In A Car Crash Wearing A Seatbelt

He said: “I regularly go around schools to give road safety advice and urge pupils to be strapped in. “It can prevent serious injuries or even save your life. “It has been the law for more than 30 years to wear a seatbelt and only takes a few seconds to buckle up, but it is still surprising the amount of people who don’t. “It is very brave of Sukhi to share her experience and hopefully it will hit home how wearing a seatbelt can make a difference. “She doesn’t want any other family to suffer the heartbreak she has had to endure.” Birmingham Crown Court heard in December how Amar had kissed his mother, telling her he loved her, just hours before the crash that claimed his life. In a victim impact statement, his mother also revealed his kidneys, heart, liver and pancreas had been donated to help save five lives. She told the court she was “really proud that other lives had been saved by her son.”
in a car crash wearing a seatbelt 3

In A Car Crash Wearing A Seatbelt

How big is the problem of crash-related injuries and deaths to drivers and passengers? Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death among those aged 1-54 in the U.S.1 Most crash-related deaths in the United States occur to passenger vehicle occupants (drivers and passengers).2 For adults and older children (who are big enough for seat belts to fit properly), seat belt use is one of the most effective ways to save lives and reduce injuries in crashes.3 Yet millions do not buckle up on every trip.4 Deaths A total of 22,441 passenger vehicle occupants died in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2015.2 More than half (range: 52%-59%) of teens (13-19 years) and adults aged 20-44 years who died in crashes in 2015 were unrestrained at the time of the crash.2 Injuries More than 2.5 million drivers and passengers were treated in emergency departments as the result of being injured in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2015.1 Young adult drivers and passengers (18-24) have the highest crash-related non-fatal injury rates of all adults.5 Costs Non-fatal crash injuries to drivers and passengers resulted in more than $48 billion in lifetime medical and work loss costs in 2010.6
in a car crash wearing a seatbelt 4

In A Car Crash Wearing A Seatbelt

The court heard that Amar’s 12-year-old cousin suffered multiple leg fractures in the crash and may now be left with one leg shorter than the other. The Mitsubishi driver also suffered a brain injury, which has left her with significant restricted eye movement and profound psychological impairment. Dad-of-four Hussain, from Dudley, West Mids., told the court he was “truly sorry” for his actions, but Judge Francis Laird QC said he had shown no “true remorse”. The taxi driver was also banned from driving for seven years and ordered to complete an extended driving test. Judge Francis Laird QC said: “The footage reveals a ferocious impact. “You walked away with relatively minor injuries but the consequences for those in the Mitsubishi were truly horrific. “The effects of what you did on that fateful afternoon will last with others for the rest of their lives. “You have presented as a man drowning in self-pity for your own predicament. I have found there is no true remorse within you for what you did.” Officers from Central Motorway Police Group (CMPG) will also be monitoring motorways and other routes across the Midlands as part of the week-long campaign. Drivers who are pulled over for not wearing a seatbelt face a £100 fine.
in a car crash wearing a seatbelt 5

In A Car Crash Wearing A Seatbelt

Many states handle seat belt enforcement differently. For some, not wearing a seat belt is a primary offense. This means that a driver or passenger can be pulled over solely for not wearing a seatbelt. In others, failure to wear a seat belt in a moving vehicle is a secondary offense. This means that police officers and other law enforcement officials can only pull over motorists after they’ve committed a primary offense such as speeding or failing to stop at a red light.
in a car crash wearing a seatbelt 6

In A Car Crash Wearing A Seatbelt

“Wearing a seatbelt could have saved his life, at the very least it would have given him a better chance of survival. “We can never get Amar back, but I just hope by encouraging both young and old to try and be as safe as possible, they won’t have to go through the heartbreak we have.” Sukhi joined officers from West Midlands Police at roadside checkpoints to make sure they were wearing seat belts. West Midlands Police Special Constable Clive Broadhurst has also produced a heartfelt video featuring images of Amar and Sukhi that will be used during school talks.
in a car crash wearing a seatbelt 7

In A Car Crash Wearing A Seatbelt

Statistics show that seat belts save lives. When used correctly, wearing a seat belt reduces the risk of fatal injury to front seat passenger car occupants by 45%, and risk of moderate-to-critical injury by 50%. For those riding in the rear of vans and sport-utility vehicles (SUVs) during a car crash, rear seat belts are 73% better at preventing fatalities. Keep in mind that victims are not properly restrained in more than one-half of all fatal car accidents. Also, children are likely to be buckled 92% of the time when adults in the car use seat belts, as opposed to 72% of the time when adults are not using them.

Published on Mar 10, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
| Jef-m
please edit your menu