crash your car

crash your carReviewed by michael ellison.This Is Article Aboutcrash your carCrash Your Car Crash Your Car Energy executive Aubrey McClendon slammed down the accelerator. As his Chevy Tahoe hurtled toward a highway overpass on a tiny two-lane road in Oklahoma City, he neared 90 miles per hour. The speed limit was 50.Police later found that McClendon “touched his brakes several times” before making impact but […]
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crash your car 1

Crash Your Car

Crash Your Car




Energy executive Aubrey McClendon slammed down the accelerator. As his Chevy Tahoe hurtled toward a highway overpass on a tiny two-lane road in Oklahoma City, he neared 90 miles per hour. The speed limit was 50.Police later found that McClendon “touched his brakes several times” before making impact but not hard enough to stop. By the time he crashed head-on into the concrete, he was going 78 miles per hour.McClendon died instantly. His car burst into flames. He was identified by his teeth.Police have not definitively concluded that McClendon committed suicide and they refuse to speculate further. But evidence for that scenario continues to pile up. This week, the Oklahoma City Police Department (OCPD) announced that the ex-CEO of Chesapeake Energy experienced no health trauma immediately before the March 2 crash. He was not wearing a seatbelt when the crash occurred.“He pretty much drove straight into the wall,” said Captain Paco Balderrama after first assessing the scene. “There was plenty of opportunity for him to correct and get back on the roadway and that didn’t occur.”The previous day, McClendon had been indicted on federal antitrust charges, accused of rigging the price of oil and natural gas leases in northwest Oklahoma. McClendon called the charges “wrong and unprecedented” and vowed to “prove innocence.” But as Reuters reported, the charges prompted a large investor to cut ties. His emails, too, would likely be made public if he pleaded not guilty.The possibility of an accident has not been ruled out and, in fact, it will be the default determination unless intent can be proven. Friends of McClendon told The Wall Street Journal that he often used his cellphone in the car. And OCPD investigators still want to know more about his mindset before the crash.But the reality of McClendon’s case is that suicide by car accident is difficult to determine definitively. For this reason, as a 1995 study on the subject notes, “death by automobile offers a unique opportunity for concealment of suicide intent.”That same study noted that the percentage of vehicular fatalities that are actually suicides could be anywhere from 1.6 to 5 percent, with the precise number impossible to calculate because “a significant albeit unknown proportion of vehicular deaths classified as accidents are in fact suicides.”McClendon’s collision fits the usual profile for a vehicular suicide: He was the sole occupant of his vehicle and no other cars were involved. Another 2006 study of single-car accident drivers who survived their crashes found that general suicide risk was low but that “they were engaged in looking for a solution to their problems in which the accident played a role in such a process.”In other words, if McClendon did take his own life, he may not have done so in a traditional, premeditated way. Some vehicular suicides are indeed intentional but one pioneering psychological analysis of suicidal men with a history of traffic accidents concluded that “unconscious self-destructive impulses” can be a key factor (PDF). Because car accidents are so common but so rarely used as a method of suicide, they can be used to avoid “consciously confronting” one’s own intent to die.“he automobile constitutes an ideal self-injurious or self-destructive instrument, particularly for persons intent upon camouflaging their suicidal motivation from others—and from themselves,” the researchers explained.So far, OCPD have not released any information about a suicide note, or about a previous expression of intent to commit suicide.Get The Beast In Your Inbox!Daily DigestStart and finish your day with the top stories from The Daily Beast.Cheat SheetA speedy, smart summary of all the news you need to know (and nothing you don't).By clicking “Subscribe,” you agree to have read the Terms of Use and Privacy PolicySubscribeThank You!You are now subscribed to the Daily Digest and Cheat Sheet. We will not share your email with anyone for any reason.“We don’t know what was going through his mind,” said OCPD Chief Bill Citty. “We don’t know what was going on in the cabin of the vehicle.”Police may never know for sure if the embattled energy executive wanted to die. The brutal truth is that McClendon may not have known himself.
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Crash Your Car

If you loan your car to a friend, he damages your car and both of you have car insurance, normally your insurance will pay, under collision coverage, and you’ll have to pay your deductible. The reason? Most auto insurance policy insures your vehicle plus you, any relative or anyone else who uses your car, if the use reasonably is believed to be with your consent. Insurers refer to people you allow to operate your car as permissive drivers.
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Crash Your Car

If you drive your car and cause an accident, your car insurance will pay for the damages you cause, as defined in your policy. If your friend drives and crashes your car, you may assume that he — and his car insurance — will pay for damages. In fact, you are on the hook. Here are a number of accident scenarios and what you can expect to happen.
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Crash Your Car

Dear Rich: You’ve experienced what many motorists fear – that when we hand off the keys to someone else, whether it’s an auto technician or a valet or whoever, that our car might not come back the way we left it. You sent the ABC News Fixer the post-crash photos and they were not pretty.
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Crash Your Car

The possibility of an accident has not been ruled out and, in fact, it will be the default determination unless intent can be proven. Friends of McClendon told The Wall Street Journal that he often used his cellphone in the car. And OCPD investigators still want to know more about his mindset before the crash.
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Crash Your Car

Before allowing anyone to drive your vehicle, think about the consequences. If the driver is unlicensed, it can keep your insurer from paying for accidents — and in some states get you cited by police. Your auto policy follows your vehicle, so claims that arise from a friend wrecking your car will go on your policy and affect your future car insurance rates. Think about that before handing over the keys to your car.
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Crash Your Car

Letting a friend that doesn’t have a valid license, either without one altogether or under suspension, is a bad idea. Many car insurance policies include an exclusion of coverage if the driver of your vehicle doesn’t have a valid license. And if he doesn’t have a license, it’s doubtful he’d have auto insurance. This would leave you and your friend responsible for any damages he caused in an accident. You can say it wasn’t you driving, but car owners have vicarious liability for anyone they allow to use their vehicle. Basically, this means you can be held liable along with the driver for their actions behind the wheel.
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Image via Puzant on ImgurIn the future, there’s no getting away from computers ratting you out for your human mistakes.Today Tesla Motors had to respond to yet another highly-publicized story of one of its cars crashing into something, this time a building full of people, with the owner blaming the vehicle’s semi-autonomous capabilities. And, today Tesla proved once again its vehicle’s Autopilot system was not to blame by releasing the data from the vehicle at the time of the incident.The most recent story, as reported by Electrek, was about a Tesla Model X that had crashed into a building just a week after the owner had taken delivery. The owner claimed that the Model X, “suddenly and unexpectedly accelerated at high speed on its own climbing over 39 feet of planters and crashing into a building.”AdvertisementThe owner described the incident on Tesla’s forums and stated that Tesla should halt Model X deliveries immediately.Tesla later responded to Electrek about the Model X incident claiming that the vehicle’s Autopilot feature had not been activated at the time of the incident or before, and the vehicle’s data logs showed the accelerator pedal being pressed just before the impact. Here’s the full statement from Tesla as reported by Electrek:“We analyzed the vehicle logs which confirm that this Model X was operating correctly under manual control and was never in Autopilot or cruise control at the time of the incident or in the minutes before. Data shows that the vehicle was traveling at 6 mph when the accelerator pedal was abruptly increased to 100%. Consistent with the driver’s actions, the vehicle applied torque and accelerated as instructed. Safety is the top priority at Tesla and we engineer and build our cars with this foremost in mind. We are pleased that the driver is ok and ask our customers to exercise safe behavior when using our vehicles.”Of course the information Tesla receives from the vehicle only offers a vague picture of the moments before, during and after an accident. But it’s enough to prove that the owner’s claims of the Autopilot system failing, or the vehicle acting on its own in some other way, simply isn’t accurate.SponsoredThe owner’s claims in this situation are precarious, or perhaps even suspicious, considering just a few weeks ago another similar story was widely publicized about a Model S crashing into a parked trailer. That owner claimed it happened after he parked the car while Tesla’s data proved that the owner had physically directed the Autopilot system to drive forward from inside the vehicle.The obvious suggestion is that, in both cases, the owner doesn’t want to accept responsibility for the accident. But perhaps that’s unfair to suggest, as the previous Model S incident resulted in Tesla updating the protocol for activating the Autopilot system, offering that a possibly-confusing user interface could have played a part in the accident.But the case of the Model X crashing into the building sounds like a relatively common phenomenon of human error where the driver mistakenly presses the accelerator pedal instead of the brake and panics.It doesn’t seem out of the question that there could be some early confusion with the Model X being a brand new car just recently delivered to the owner and his wife.AdvertisementUnfortunately whatever happened placed a very expensive SUV in the side of a building.Most of us have probably tried to get out of an unfortunate situation before, whether it’s an accident we’re at fault for or something else.AdvertisementThe reality now is that, with advances in technology and a future promising more automation and less human responsibility, human error will only be more obvious and easier to prove. Especially by companies with the data to back themselves up defending from users possibly looking to shift the blame for their mistakes.I’m not suggesting that Autopilot is perfect, or that an incident where the system fails to prevent an accident from happening is impossible. I’m just suggesting that we should all be more aware of what buttons we do and don’t press, as someone is always watching.







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