cars cartoon movie

cars cartoon movie

Cars Cartoon Movie

Now back in Detroit, the hype for Cars is as high as ever. Aside from Toy Story, Cars is the only Pixar franchise to reach a third chapter (along with several shorts in between). Certainly this has had a huge impact on toy sales for Disney, but you have to wonder how Cars might influence the sales of automobiles. “There might be some kid today who’s fourteen that wants a ’67 Mustang or Camaro because of the Cars movie and that iconic muscle car era,” John Waraniak, v-p of vehicle technology for the Specialty Equipment Market Association told Cartoon Brew. He believes that the combination of movies (particularly the Cars franchise) and modern automobile features (such as connectivity) are building consumer interest. “The cool thing is, cars are the new frontier of technology,” Waraniak added. “You look around here and it’s everywhere. People want to be involved in the car industry again because it has so many things happening in it. That the movie are going to help attract more people to cars.” A still from “Cars 3.” Ivan Feinseth, an analyst at Tigress Financial Partners, thinks that movies like Cars ignite the “animal spirits” within consumers that make them want to drive, regardless of age. “Believe me, as these animal spirits continue to be ignited, people are going to be motivated to buy fancy sports cars,” said Feinseth. “And all of the big manufacturers focus on special versions of high-performance – Mercedes, BMWs, Lexus, etc.” Not everyone is convinced that movies are enough to lure drivers or influence purchasing decisions, however. “I think the movie and technology around Cars is cool, but I think it’s a hard sell to say that a experience at five is going to affect a buying choice 13 to 15 years later,” said Karl Heimer, a consultant for the automotive industry. “It’ll certainly do nothing to turn off people. It’ll get lots of kids talking. I don’t know that I could create the causal chain that says it affects a car-buying decision in a world that is literally a dozen or so technological generations later.” A still from “Cars 3.” Rob Enderle, principal analyst at Enderle Group, thinks that mobile devices may continue to dominate kids’ attention, reducing their interest in driving. “We’ve got a pretty solid trend already that indicates the younger you are, the less likely it is that you’re going to want a driver’s license,” Enderle explained to Cartoon Brew. “And the more likely it is you’re going to use an car service.” On the upside, driver preferences won’t stop kids from piling into theaters on June 16, which is good news for Pixar. “Disney is on a roll,” said Feinseth, referring to the studio’s “incredible slate” for 2017. Besides the new edition of Cars, Disney’s lineup in the first half of this year includes the live-action Beauty and the Beast on March 17, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 on May 5, and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales on May 26.
cars cartoon movie 1

Cars Cartoon Movie

Mesterius “He quickly realized that the story would be even better if told with actual cars. ” Actually, no it wouldn’t. Can someone please inform Lasseter of this? slowtiger So Cars is presented at a car show and people hope to sell more cars with it. Isn’t that a bit … simplicistic? And while we’re at it, can’t we put some more intelligent messages in films instead, like renewable energy, how to deal with climate change, peak oil, clean water, and so on? OK, it’s just an animated movie for children. But I really expect a bit more effort from Pixar than “hey, we could sell cars with it.” Jeffrey Thrash Glad I’m not the only one who wants more environmentalist messages, especially in kid’s movies. Considering how gloomy most climate change predictions are, you’d think people would be rushing for solutions to mitigate any future damage, regardless of whether they believe human pollution is the cause. That said, it would be hard to convince people to watch a movie about such a depressing and divisive topic–for instance, can you imagine someone who is already alarmed by extreme weather lining up to watch Before the Flood? How about a more conservative person sick of what they perceive to be fear-mongering from the left? Still, I hope that when a decent environmentalist movie does come, it doesn’t sugar-coat the problem too much (e.g. the SpongeBob TV special where they fail to stop Plankton’s highway plan, but still manage to undo all of the damage he caused with a magic steamroller and a song in their hearts). Also, considering the last two Cars movies, it would be a bit too optimistic to think Pixar will use the third film to push a profound statement that will nudge the next generation towards a more enlightened future. We should be happy that Pixar is making the series more “mature” at all, though so far all I see of that is “edginess” and a muted color palette. AnthonyA I suppose I did think about purchasing a Hudson Hornet after watching the first Cars film, but that impulse didn’t last too long. But purchasing a fifty year old car wouldn’t have done much to drive current or future sales. Elsi Pote Rae I reaallllllyyyyy doubt the “Cars” franchise will have any significant Red Stapler affect on its audience. But that’s p. funny since everyone I’ve made watch the trailers thought it was a Scion ad at first (and then EYES) I agree wholeheartedly with SlowTiger & Jeffery Thrash, this is so simple, why hasn’t, after all this time and success, Pixar taken a bit more of a risk when it comes to complex stories? These are some of the greatest story tellers at work these days, are they not? A film with anthropomorphic cars that actually questions the way their world works and how the sentient machines within such have to live with it is what I’d look forward to. “Clean energy” was /kind of/ a topic in the 2nd movie, but like, imagine that the cars themselves, just by /being alive/ are causing all of the problems (de-icers, tire burning, scrap, by-products), they would either have to find a clean solution or totally modify the entirety of their anatomy so that they can pass an emissions test. What about the cars who couldn’t afford such a reconstruction? What about out-modes? What about an adapt-or-die scenario? IDK, I just feel like, as silly as the premise is, they could have written more complex, complicated stories and they just didn’t. Again, I KNOW this film is aimed at a younger audience and its biggest intention is to sell merch, but c’mon, Pixar, don’t kids deserve a good story? They ain’t dumb. mechasus They hope a movie like this will drive future car ownership. Meanwhile Uber, Lyft, and public transit are out there giving people reasons to ditch their cars, and that goes without mentioning self-driving cars. It’s a lot bigger deal than just advertising and sales, buddy. Pedro Nakama When is the Pixar Cars Universe going to combine with the Disney Herbie the Love Bug Universe?
cars cartoon movie 2

Cars Cartoon Movie

Claudia Puig of USA Today gave the film a positive review, saying “The animation is stunningly rendered. But the story is always the critical element in Pixar movies, and Cars’ story is heartfelt with a clear and unabashed moral.” David Edelstein of New York Magazine gave the film a positive review, saying “Like the Toy Story films, Cars is a state-of-the-computer-art plea on behalf of outmoded, wholesome fifties technology, with a dash of Zen by way of George Lucas.” Roger Moore of the Orlando Sentinel gave the film three out of five stars, saying “It’s beautiful to look at. The talking cars feel more alive than talking cars should.” Peter Howell of the Toronto Star gave the film three out of four stars, saying “Cars made me want to hop in my jalopy and to head out to Route 66, bypassing the boring interstate highways that made the Mother Road redundant.” Moira MacDonald of The Seattle Times gave the film three and a half stars out of four, saying “Though the central idea of nostalgia for a quieter, small-town life may well be lost on this movie’s young audience — Cars finds a pleasant and often sparkling groove.” Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle gave the film two out of five stars, saying “Cars might get us into car world as a gimmick, but it doesn’t get us into car world as a state of mind. Thus, the animation, rather than seeming like an expression of the movie’s deeper truth, becomes an impediment to it.” Derek Adams of Time Out gave the film a positive review, saying “There are many other brilliant scenes, some just as funny but there are just as many occasions where you feel the film’s struggling to fire on all cylinders. Still, it’s a Pixar film, right? And they’re always worth a gander no matter what anyone says.”

Cars Cartoon Movie

Cars Cartoon Movie
Cars Cartoon Movie
Cars Cartoon Movie
Cars Cartoon Movie

Published on Aug 8, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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