car crash statistics

car crash statistics

Car Crash Statistics

Private insurers pay approximately 50% of all motor vehicle crash costs. Individual crash victims pay about 26%, while third parties such as uninvolved motorists delayed in traffic, charities and health care providers pay about 14%. Federal revenues account for 6%, while state and local municipalities pick up about 3%. Overall, those not directly involved in crashes pay for nearly three-quarters of all crash costs, primarily through insurance premiums, taxes and travel delay (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration).
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Car Crash Statistics

How can deaths and injuries resulting from crashes involving teen drivers be prevented? There are proven methods to helping teens become safer drivers. Seat Belts Of the teens (aged 16-19) who died in passenger vehicle crashes in 2014 approximately 53% were not wearing a seat belt at the time of the crash.2 Research shows that seat belts reduce serious crash-related injuries and deaths by about half.14 Not Drinking & Driving Enforcing minimum legal drinking age laws and zero blood-alcohol tolerance laws for drivers under age 21 are recommended. Graduated Driver Licensing Programs (GDL) Driving is a complex skill, one that must be practiced to be learned well. Teenagers’ lack of driving experience, together with risk-taking behavior, puts them at heightened risk for crashes. The need for skill-building and driving supervision for new drivers is the basis for graduated driver licensing programs, which exist in all US states and Washington, DC. GDL provides longer practice periods, limits driving under high risk conditions for newly licensed drivers, and requires greater participation of parents in their teens’ learning-to-drive. Research suggests that the more comprehensive GDL programs are associated with reductions of 26% to 41% in fatal crashes and reductions of 16% to 22% in overall crashes, among 16-year-old drivers. When parents know their state’s GDL laws, they can help enforce the laws and, in effect, help keep their teen drivers safe. Eight Danger Zones Make sure your young driver is aware of the leading causes of teen crashes: Driver inexperience Driving with teen passengers Nighttime driving Not using seat belts Distracted driving Drowsy driving Reckless driving Impaired driving Learn what research has shown parents can do to keep teen drivers safe from each of these risks. Learn More
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Car Crash Statistics

In 2015, the types of motor vehicle crash deaths varied across states. For example, Wyoming and North Dakota had the highest percentage of deaths involving occupants of SUVs and pickups (50 percent) and some of the lowest proportions of deaths including car occupants (23 and 27 percent).  In contrast, Massachusetts had one of the highest proportions of car occupant deaths (41 percent), a relatively high proportion of pedestrian deaths (24 percent), and a relatively low percentage of deaths involving SUV or pickup occupants (13 percent).  The highest percentage of motorcyclist deaths occurred in New Hampshire and South Dakota (23 percent each).  The percentage of pedestrian deaths was highest in the District of Columbia (57 percent).
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Car Crash Statistics

Allstate’s survey of the 200 largest cities in America based on car collision frequency. For example, drivers in Kansas City, KS are 24.8 percent less likely to experience a car collision while drivers in Boston, MA are 157.7 percent more likely to experience a car collision.
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Car Crash Statistics

Allstate’s survey of the 200 largest cities in America based on car collision frequency. For example, drivers in Kansas City, KS are 24.8 percent less likely to experience a car collision while drivers in Boston, MA are 157.7 percent more likely to experience a car collision. Source: Allstate.
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Car Crash Statistics

The number and types of motor vehicle crash deaths differ widely among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. A state’s population has an obvious effect on the number of motor vehicle deaths. Fatality rates per capita and per vehicle miles traveled provide a way of examining motor vehicle deaths relative to the population and amount of driving. However, many factors can affect these rates, including types of vehicles driven, travel speeds, rates of licensure, state traffic laws, emergency care capabilities, weather, and topography.The following facts are based on analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS).Posted November 2016.
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Car Crash Statistics

Alcohol-Related Crashes: In 2013, 10,076 people were killed in alcohol-impaired driving crashes (any fatal crash involving a driver with a blood-alcohol content (BAC) of 0.08 percent or higher), down 2.5 percent from 10,336 in 2012. Of the persons who were killed in traffic crashes in 2013, 31 percent died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes. In 2010, drunk driving alone accounted for 18% of the total economic loss from motor vehicle crashes, costing the economy as much as $199 billion in direct and quality-of-life losses (NHTSA).
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Car Crash Statistics

Out of concern for public safety and to help reduce the cost of crashes, insurers support safe driving initiatives. In 1969 the insurance industry created the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), an organization best known for its vehicle crashworthiness testing program. In the 1970s the industry began the campaign to get auto manufacturers to make air bags standard equipment in vehicles. It is a major supporter of antidrunk driving and seatbelt usage campaigns. Drivers themselves have also contributed to the reduction in crash-related fatalities by demanding safer vehicles.
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The risk of motor vehicle crashes is higher among 16-19-year-olds than among any other age group. In fact, per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are nearly three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in a fatal crash.2
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Learn more about the effects of blood alcohol concentration. What factors put teen drivers at risk? Teens are more likely than older drivers to underestimate dangerous situations or not be able to recognize hazardous situations.7 Teens are also more likely than adults to make critical decision errors that lead to serious crashes.8 Teens are more likely than older drivers to speed and allow shorter headways (the distance from the front of one vehicle to the front of the next). The presence of male teenage passengers increases the likelihood of this risky driving behavior.9 In 2014, 50% of teen deaths from motor vehicle crashes occurred between 3 p.m. and midnight and 53% occurred on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday.2 Compared with other age groups, teens have among the lowest rates of seat belt use. In 2015, only 61% of high school students reported they always wear seat belts when riding with someone else.10 At all levels of blood alcohol concentration (BAC), the risk of involvement in a motor vehicle crash is greater for teens than for older drivers.11 Among male drivers between 15 and 20 years of age who were involved in fatal crashes in 2014, 36% were speeding at the time of the crash10 and 24% had been drinking.12 In 2014, 17% of drivers aged 16 to 20 involved in fatal motor vehicle crashes had a BAC of .08% or higher.13 In a national survey conducted in 2015, 20% of teens reported that, within the previous month, they had ridden with a driver who had been drinking alcohol. Among students who drove, 8% reported having driven after drinking alcohol within the same one-month period.10 In 2014, 64% of drivers aged 15 to 20 who were killed in motor vehicle crashes after drinking and driving were not wearing a seat belt.12
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The number and types of motor vehicle crash deaths differ widely among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. A state’s population has an obvious effect on the number of motor vehicle deaths. Fatality rates per capita and per vehicle miles traveled provide a way of examining motor vehicle deaths relative to the population and amount of driving. However, many factors can affect these rates, including types of vehicles driven, travel speeds, rates of licensure, state traffic laws, emergency care capabilities, weather, and topography.
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Nationwide, 55 percent of motor vehicle crash deaths in 2015 occurred in single-vehicle crashes. The largest proportion of deaths in single-vehicle crashes occurred in the District of Columbia (70 percent), Montana (68 percent), and Maine (67 percent), whereas the smallest proportion occurred in Minnesota (47 percent). 
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Based on daytime observational surveys conducted by the states, the rate of safety belt use among front seat passenger vehicle occupants in 2015 ranged from 70 percent in New Hampshire to 97 percent in Georgia. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 2016. Seat belt use in 2015 — use rates in the states and territories. Report no. DOT HS-812-274. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Transportation. Rates of restraint use among fatally injured motor vehicle occupants will be lower than observed restraint use because unrestrained occupants are more likely than restrained occupants to be fatally injured in a crash. Restrained fatally injured occupants include occupants in child safety seats and occupants restrained by safety belts. Two states, California and Maryland, and the District of Columbia had at least 60 percent restraint use among fatally injured passenger vehicle occupants.  In contrast, six states — Massachusetts, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming — had use rates below 30 percent. 
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Year Number As a percent of all crash deaths 2006 13,491 32% 2007 13,041 32 2008 11,711 31 2009 10,759 32 2010 10,136 31 2011 9,865 30 2012 10,336 31 2013 10,110 31 2014 9,943 30 2015 10,265 29 Alcohol-impaired driving crashes are crashes that involve at least one driver or a motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or above, the legal definition of drunk driving. Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
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Nonetheless, the number of deaths, and deaths relative to the total population, has declined over the last two decades. From 1979 to 2005, the number of deaths per year decreased 14.97% while the number of deaths per capita decreased by 35.46%. The 32,479 traffic fatalities in 2011 were the lowest in 62 years . Note: US motor death statistics reported by government only include those on public roads, they do not include parking lots, driveways and private roads.

Published on May 3, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
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