always crashing in the same car

always crashing in the same car

Always Crashing In The Same Car

About “Always Crashing In The Same CarAlways Crashing In The Same Car ’s lyrics express the frustration of making the same mistake over and over. The narrator of the song recounts driving at high speed in circles around a hotel garage, cautiously checking for danger, yet still inevitably crashing, while a girl named Jasmine looks on.
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Always Crashing In The Same Car

Always Crashing has such melancholic poise and takes you on a journey. I agree that the thought of Bowie repeatedly crashing his car into a dealers car doesn’t ring true – but what do we know really. Will Bowie ever do a Keith and write an autobiography? Perhaps he thinks there are too many books about him already, and besides, there’s always another painting it complete. Something I’m sure he’s doing a lot of these days.
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Always Crashing In The Same Car

From Warsaw back to Los Angeles: “Always Crashing in the Same Car,” one of the last songs completed on Low, is a final meditation on Bowie’s LA period. The lyric was allegedly inspired by a) Bowie, spying a drug dealer who had ripped him off, ramming his car into the dealer’s, or b) Bowie speeding around an underground parking garage like a lunatic, half-trying to kill himself (the latter occurring either in LA or Berlin, depending on who you read). Both stories seem a bit suspect, especially the idea of Bowie as an avenging Sonny Corleone type. “Crashing” seems to be atoning for something, though; it’s a purgatorial island in the middle of Low‘s manic side.
always crashing in the same car 3

Always Crashing In The Same Car

Always Crashing In The Same Car ’s lyrics express the frustration of making the same mistake over and over. The narrator of the song recounts driving at high speed in circles around a hotel garage, cautiously checking for danger, yet still inevitably crashing, while a girl named Jasmine looks on.
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The song’s lyrics express the frustration of making the same mistake over and over. The narrator of the song recounts driving at high speed in circles around a hotel garage, cautiously checking for danger, yet still inevitably crashing, while a girl named Jasmine looks on.
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The players come alive as well. Davis’ loud Harmonized drums appear in the second verse and he throws in some fills (fittingly, under “round and round” in the second verse). Ricky Gardiner, who already offered a four-bar guitar solo at the end of the first chorus, essentially takes over the song, getting the entire third verse to deliver a masterful solo (Gardiner’s tone and the sharp melodic sense of his lines is similar to Tom Verlaine’s work on Marquee Moon). Bowie hummed the first three notes of the solo to him, Gardiner took off from there.* And where most of Low‘s “rock” tracks are faded out, “Crashing” slowly comes to a complete stop, ending on a resounding E minor chord. The past, rather than endlessly repeating, gets resolved with a show of force.
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The song refers to a real life incident in Bowie’s life that occurred at the height of his cocaine addiction. Driving his Mercedes, Bowie had spotted a drug dealer on the streets who he believed had ripped him off. In retaliation, Bowie repeatedly rammed his own car into the dealer’s car, after which he returned to his hotel and ended up driving around in circles in the hotel’s underground garage.
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While the rhythm tracks were cut during the early Low sessions at Château d’Hérouville, Bowie was stuck for a time coming up with lyrics and a vocal melody (running through ideas, he even sang a verse in a parody of Bob Dylan’s voice, though tragically the vocal track was wiped—Tony Visconti later described it as being “spooky, not funny”). Hugo Wilcken makes a good case that Bowie rifled through Syd Barrett solo tracks for lyrical cues (e.g., “No Good Trying”: “you’re spinning around and around in a car with electric lights flashing very fast.“)
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The sheet music I have (the original “Station to Station/Low” book, pub. 1977) says “I was always working left and right.” Not an Americanism as far as I know. Maybe it was intended as a play on “looking left and right” (i.e. driving, though it’s weird, as that means Bowie was driving cautiously, which doesn’t quite fit the mood of the song)…and eventually DB just used the “looking” instead?
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I agree as well cannot se Bowie as Charles Bronson really but maybe him in the underground garage ..screeching tyres and a passenger cowering ..? I suspect more like his life felt like he was repeating the same mistakes ? Management worries, divorce ,money and drug busts? its a great piece anyway and your write is very befitting of it .

Published on Mar 22, 2017 | Under Car | By michael ellis
| Jef-m
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